PREVIOUS ARTISTS OF THE MONTH

Current Artist of the Month
Object of the Month
Robert Buhler RA, <I>Green Park</I>, oil on canvas, 1947 <br>© Royal Academy of Arts, London Artist of the Month - January 2010

Robert Buhler RA (1916-1989)
Green Park is one of a series of cityscapes, which Buhler painted in the 1940s. This wintry view of the Green Park is painted with Buhler's typically muted colouring and soft tonality broken only by the flash of a bold red double-decker bus.
 
William Hamilton, RA, <I>Vertumnus and Pomona</I>, oil on canvas, ca.1789<br>© Royal Academy of Arts, London. Artist of the Month - February 2010

William Hamilton RA (1751-1801)
Vertumnus and Pomona is a depiction of a tale known mainly from Ovid's Metamorphoses. This work represents a shift in Hamilton's work from portraiture to subject pictures.
 
<I>Winchelsea Churchyard, Sussex</I>, pencil and watercolour, ca.1795 <br>© Royal Academy of Arts, London. Artist of the Month - March 2010

Michael 'Angelo' Rooker ARA (1746 - 1801)
Rooker is said to have depicted architecture 'as if he loved every brick and stone and was aware of life behind every window'
 
The Faithful Hound, oil on canvas, ca. 1830<br>© Royal Academy of Arts, London. Artist of the Month - April 2010

Sir Edwin Landseer RA (1802-1873)
Landseer made his reputation through depictions of dogs and deer, which he often invested with human characteristics. Queen Victoria was a keen admirer and commissioned him to paint many portraits of the Royal family and their pets.
 
<I>The Village Buffoon</I>, oil on canvas, 1816 <br>© Royal Academy of Arts, London. Artist of the Month - May 2010

William Mulready RA (1786-1863)
William Mulready was born in Co. Clare, Ireland but spent most of his life in the Bayswater area of London. A gifted artist from an early age he entered the Royal Academy Schools in 1800.
 
<I>The Gateway to the Great Temple at Baalbec</I>, oil on panel, 1841 <br> © Royal Academy of Arts, London Artist of the Month - June 2010

David Roberts RA (1796-1864)
David Roberts was the first independent British artist to travel and paint extensively in the Near East. His evocative portrayals of ancient monuments and vast desert landscapes brought the topography of Egypt and the 'lands of the Bible' to an appreciative European audience.
 
Julian Trevelyan <I>Thames Regatta</I>,  offset lithograph, 1951 <br>© Royal Academy of Arts, London Artist of the Month - July 2010

Julian Trevelyan RA (1910-1988)
While studying English at Cambridge Trevelyan became acquainted with Surrealist ideas and was fascinated by the human sub-conscious. Over the next 50 years Trevelyan would generate countless imaginative works, but the printmaking medium would dominate.

 
Chris Orr RA, <i> The Small Titanic</i>, counterproof etching, 1993 <br>© Royal Academy of Arts, London Artist of the Month - August 2010

Chris Orr RA (b.1943)
Throughout his career Chris Orr has worked in various media, producing countless drawings, paintings and printed works. Early in his twenties, Orr became fascinated with the practice of printmaking because of its experimental qualities, multiple nature and strong connection to books.


 
John Flaxman RA, <I>Ulysses and his Dog</I>, pencil, pen and ink on paper, 1792-93<br>© Royal Academy of Arts, London Artist of the Month - September 2010

John Flaxman RA (1755-1826)
Flaxman was recognised as one of the leading sculptors of his day but it was his talent as a draughtsman that won him international acclaim. While living in Rome in the early 1790s he produced dynamic yet understated outline illustrations of the works of Dante, Homer and Aeschylus which were an immediate success and were published as engravings throughout Europe.

 
<b>[1]</b> <i>Bust of Teucer</i>, bronze, after 1882 <br>© Royal Academy of Arts, London Artist of the Month - October 2010

Sir Hamo Thornycroft RA (1850-1925)
Thornycroft was an early exponent of the New Sculpture movement, which championed a more naturalistic and detailed approach to modelling.
 
image of AST480 Artist of the Month - November 2010

Eadweard Muybridge 1830-1904
Muybridge began his photographic studies of animals in motion through a commission from the Governor of California, Leland Stanford, who wanted to study the gait of his horses with the aim of improving their racing performance.
 
image of AST3873 Artist of the Month - December 2010

Sir Hubert von Herkomer RA (1849-1914)
Herkomer's earlier work exploring some of the harsher aspects of contemporary life was revisited in the work given to the Royal Academy on his election as an Academician in 1890. On Strike is painted on a huge scale and succeeds in engendering sympathy for the families of striking workers.
 
<i>Sickness</i>, marble, 1778 <br>© Royal Academy of Arts, London Artist of the Month - January 2011

John Bacon RA (1740-1799)
Bacon's Diploma Work, given to the Royal Academy on his election to full Membership, was Sickness which is a copy of the head of figure which forms part of the monument to Thomas Guy in Guy's Hospital Chapel, London (1779).
 
> <i>Bust of the Marchioness of Granby</i>, Marble, 1902 <br>© Royal Academy of Arts, London Artist of the Month - February 2011

Sir George Frampton RA (1860-1928)
Frampton's bust of The Marchioness of Granby depicts Violet Lindsay, later Marchioness of Granby, a practicing artist and member of an aristocratic circle of aesthetes known as 'The Souls'. In her later years she continued to live by aesthetic codes, wearing unconventional flowing garments in muted colours pinned with exotic brooches, as seen in Frampton's bust.
 
Sir Lawrence Alma-Tadema, <i>The Way to the Temple</i>, oil on canvas, 1882 <br>©Royal Academy of Arts, London Artist of the Month - March 2011

Sir Lawrence Alma-Tadema RA (1836-1912)
Alma-Tadema's trip to Pompeii in 1863 inspired a fascination with classicism that defined the rest of his career and influenced his approach to the interior design of his home.
 
Ivor Abrahams RA, <I>The Masque of the Red Death</I>, screenprint, 1976 <br>© Royal Academy of Arts, London Artist of the Month - April 2011

Ivor Abrahams RA (b.1935)
The Masque of the Red Death is typical of Abrahams' approach to Edgar Allan Poe. Rather than depict the climatic scene, when at the stroke of midnight the figure of the Red Death wreaks slaughter amongst the revellers, the artist presents instead an incriminating object found after the event.
 
John Gibson RA, <i>Sleeping Shepherd Boy</i>, plaster, 1818<br>© Royal Academy of Arts, London Artist of the Month - May 2011

John Gibson RA (1790-1866)
John Gibson moved to Rome in 1817 and developed an affinity with the art, architecture and atmosphere of the city. Gibson was guided and supported by Antonio Canova and he wholeheartedly adopted his mentor's neo-classical ideals, refusing to sculpt subjects in contemporary costume.

 
Sir David Wilkie RA, <i> Boys Digging for Rats</i>, oil on board, 1812 <br>© Royal Academy of Arts, London Artist of the Month - June 2011

Sir David Wilkie R.A. (1785-1841)
Wilkie excelled in this kind of low-life subject, which was immensely popular with the public. He was particularly skillful in choosing scenes which were not only entertaining but also, through expressive gestures and carefully posed figures, involved the viewer in a narrative.
 
William Etty RA, <i>Sleeping Nymph and Satyrs</i>,  oil on canvas, 1828 <br>© Royal Academy of Arts, London Artist of the Month - July 2011

William Etty RA (1787-1849)
William Etty was the first major British artist to specialise in painting nudes. A quiet, conservative bachelor who claimed that his only vice was drinking too much tea, Etty was an unlikely pioneer for this controversial genre.
 
Angelica Kauffman, <i>Colour</i>, oil on canvas, ca. 1778-80 <br> ©Royal Academy of Arts, London Artist of the Month - August 2011

Angelica Kauffman RA (1741-1807)
All her life, she enjoyed international patronage such as the family of George III in Britain, Prince Nikolay Yusupov in Russia and Emperor Joseph II of Austria among others. She died in Rome where her funeral was arranged by the Neo-classical sculptor Antonio Canova (1757-1822).
 
Richard Eurich, RA  <i>The Mariner's Return</i>, oil on canvas, 1953 <br> © Royal Academy of Arts, London Artist of the Month - September 2011

Richard Eurich, RA (1903-1992)
Eurich moved in 1934 to Dibden Purlieu, Hampshire, where the nearby Solent and Southampton docks became an important source of inspiration. Eurich's love of and talent for painting coastal scenes was recognised in the early 1940s, when he was appointed an Official War Artist to the Admiralty.
 
John Constable, RA <i>The Leaping Horse</i>, oil on canvas, 1825  <br>© Royal Academy of Arts, London Artist of the Month - October 2011

John Constable, RA (1776-1837)
In 1819 Constable embarked upon a series of large six-foot canvases with the aim of making his reputation as a serious landscape painter. The Leaping Horse is from this series and depicts a tow horse jumping one of the barriers erected along the path by the River Stour to prevent cattle from straying.
 
image of AST3903 Artist of the Month - November 2011

Alfred Parsons,RA (1847-1920)
Parsons was not only a successful landscape painter but also an illustrator and garden designer who served as a judge at the Chelsea Flower Show. Born in Somerset in 1847, Parsons was a Post Office clerk for two years before he left to study art at the age of 20.
 
F. Ernest Jackson ARA, Portrait of Dorothy Hutton, pencil on wove paper. © Royal Academy of Arts, London Artist of the Month - December 2011

F. Ernest Jackson, ARA (1872-1945)

The draughtsman, lithographer and painter, F. Ernest Jackson, is little known today. But this suited him well in his lifetime, as he humorously told a friend, 'I want to live in obscurity. Remember, you can't do things and get the credit for them. Getting the credit is a wholetime job.'
 
Carel Weight RA, <i>The Silence</i>, oil on board, 1965 <br>© Royal Academy of Arts, London Artist of the Month - January 2012

Weight was influenced by artists such as Edward Munch and James Ensor. In The Silence from 1965, Weight paints three figures in his Battersea garden observing the two minutes silence on Remembrance Sunday.
 
Olwyn Bowey, RA <I>Life-drawing of an old woman</I>, pencil on wove paper, late 1960s
© Royal Academy of Arts, London Artist of the Month - February 2012

Olwyn Bowey, RA (b. 1936)
Olwyn Bowey, who celebrates her seventy-sixth birthday this month, is primarily known for her intimate depictions of greenhouses and plant life.
 
John Singer Sargent RA, <i>At Torre Galli: Ladies in a Garden</i>, oil on canvas, 1910. <br>© Royal Academy of Arts, London Artist of the Month - March 2012

John Singer Sargent RA (1856-1925)
Sargent was well travelled and was equally at home in Italy, France, England or the United States. His friend, the American novelist Henry James, once remarked that the painter had 'high talent, a charming nature, artistic and personal, and is civilized to his finger-tips'.
 
Edward Stott ARA, <i>Study for 'The Holy Family'</i>, pastel on laid toned paper, ca. 1917  <br>© Royal Academy of Arts, London Artist of the Month - April 2012

Edward Stott ARA (1859-1918)
Described in 1908 as 'the poet-painter of the twilight', the painter and draughtsman Edward Stott was well known in his time for his atmospheric depictions of rural and biblical scenes imbued with an ethereal quality.
 
Charles West Cope RA, <i>The Council of the Royal Academy selecting Pictures for the Exhibition, 1875</i>, oil on canvas, 1875-76  <br>© Royal Academy of Arts, London Artist of the Month - May 2012

Charles West Cope RA (1811 - 1890)
This magnificent group portrait by Charles West Cope shows a group of Royal Academicians selecting paintings for the Summer Exhibition of 1875.
 
Sir Joshua Reynolds PRA, <i>Portrait of King George III</i>, oil on canvas, 1779 <br>© Royal Academy of Arts, London Artist of the Month - June 2012

Sir Joshua Reynolds PRA (1723-1792)

Joshua Reynolds was unanimously elected the first President of the Royal Academy of Arts when it was founded in 1768. At the time, he was widely regarded as the most successful painter in Britain and, as such, was the obvious choice to lead the newly formed Academy. However, Reynolds was not a favourite of George III, the Academy's royal patron and founder.
 
Agostino Carlini RA, <i>Bust of George III</i>, marble, 1773. <br>© Royal Academy of Arts, London Artist of the Month - July 2012

Carlini's marble bust depicts King George III in Classical dress. It was displayed on the mantelpiece in the Library in the Academy's rooms in Somerset House. This was an appropriate setting, as the King was a renowned bibliophile and had donated several books to the Academy's library
 
image of AST3988 Artist of the Month - August 2012

Anne Desmet describes her work as pulling in two directions: 'one body of work is essentially topographical, but often subject to metamorphoses; the other is concerned with intuitive architectural fantasies, urban myths and histories of urban destruction and regeneration'.
 
image of AST13021 Artist of the Month - September 2012

The painter and designer G.B. Cipriani was born in Florence, Italy, but spent most of his life in London. Throughout his career, Cipriani maintained a close working relationship with the influential archtect Sir William Chambers, producing elegant neo-classical designs for both the interior and exterior decoration of his buildings
 
Henry Herschel Hay Cameron, <i>Alfred, Lord Tennyson</i>, photogravure, c. 1888. <br> © Royal Academy of Arts, London Artist of the Month - October 2012

When Henry H.H. Cameron was eight, the family moved to Freshwater, on the Isle of Wight. It was here that his mother, the photographer Julia Margaret Cameron, developed a much closer and more intense association with the Tennyson family, who lived a short distance away.
 
Thomas Banks RA, <i>The Falling Titan</i>, marble, 1786 <br>© Royal Academy of Arts, London Artist of the Month - November 2012

Banks presented The Falling Titan to the Royal Academy in 1786. It depicts the failed attempt of an earthbound giant to reach Olympus and overthrow Jupiter by piling up great boulders. Dramatic foreshortening heightens the dynamism of the tumbling titan.

 
image of AST23306 Artist of the Month - December 2012

Joseph Mallord William Turner RA (1775-1851) is one of the most celebrated of all British artists. Engaging with both the art of the Old Masters and contemporary aesthetic theory, Turner profoundly altered the perception of landscape painting among his contemporaries and for future generations. His extraordinary artistic output emphatically demonstrated the power of this genre to embody poetic, emotive and historical themes.
 
<b>[1]</b> Thomas Gainsborough RA, <i>Self-portrait</i>, oil on canvas, c. 1787. Artist of the Month - January 2013

Thomas Gainsborough initially found success as a painter of portraits, and his Self-portrait demonstrates his ability in this genre. With a seemingly effortless technique of expressive and sketchily applied brushwork, Gainsborough captures a fleeting expression as he turns and gazes quizzically at the viewer.
 
John Constable, <i>The Leaping Horse</i>, oil on canvas, 1825 <br>© Royal Academy of Arts, London. Artist of the Month - February 2013

Constable was a dedicated to painting nature. He made hundreds of sketches direct from nature and imbued his studio paintings with a feeling of open-air spontaneity.
 
] Sydney Lee RA, <i>The Red Tower</i>, 1928. Oil on canvas. <br>© Royal Academy of Arts, London Artist of the Month - March 2013

For four decades, Lee travelled throughout Britain and Europe in search of subjects. He became highly regarded for his prints as well as his paintings, working in a wide variety of media including woodcut, wood engraving, etching and aquatint.
 
Sir Albert Waterlow RA, <i>The Banks of the River Loing</i>, oil on canvas, 1903 <br>© Royal Academy of Arts, London Artist of the Month - April 2013

Waterlow's painting portrays a tranquil scene on the River Loing, a branch of the Seine that flows south of Paris near the Forest of Fontainebleau.
 
Rob Petherick, <i>H. T. Cadbury-Brown RA</i>, silver gelatin print, 1997. 
© Royal Academy of Arts, London Artist of the Month - May 2013

The architect H. T. Cadbury-Brown tained at the Architectural Association in 1930-35 where he was first introduced by another student to the work of the pioneering modernist architect, Le Corbusier, and was immediately, in his own words, 'hooked'.
 
image of AST13734 Artist of the Month - July 2013

The painter Laura Knight (née Johnson) was born on 4 August 1877 at Long Eaton, Derbyshire. She was a voracious artist from a very young age, writing in her autobiography, The Magic of a Line (1965), that 'I had loved pencil and paper to be thrust through the bars of my cradle'. After her father left, Laura's mother provided for the family through teaching art in Nottingham, and early on spotted her daughter's talent. Laura trained at the Nottingham School of Art from 1890 to 1895 where she met her future husband, the painter Harold Knight RA (1874-1961). The couple married in 1903.
 
image of AST13726 Artist of the Month - June 2013

Sir Hugh Casson was probably the most popular British architect of his time. In such high-profile roles as Director of Architecture for the 1951 Festival of Britain and President of the Royal Academy of Arts, he successfully bridged the gap which divided traditional and modern artists and architects during the mid-twentieth century. His great wit and charm, coupled with a light and fluent touch in design and drawing, delighted the arts profession and the public alike.
 
John Everett Millais PRA <i>A Souvenir of Velazquez</i>, oil on canvas, 1868<br>© Royal Academy of Arts, London Artist of the Month - August 2013

A Souvenir of Velazquez by Millais was inspired by Velázquez's mid-16th-century portraits of the Spanish Infanta Maria Margarita. Throughout his career Millais painted children to provoke meditations on transience, beauty and truth.
 
James Bateman RA, <i>Man Standing and Study of Hands (Study for 'Commotion in the Cattle Ring')</i>, pencil on wove paper, c. 1935.
© The Artist's Estate Artist of the Month - September 2013

Described as having 'that English tradition of reverence for earthy things', James Bateman RA was a painter and engraver of scenes of country life.
 
Benjamin West PRA, <i>Death on the Pale Horse</i>, 1783 (retouched 1803) pen and brown ink with wash and gouache
© Royal Academy of Arts, London Artist of the month - October 2013

This striking drawing of the Apocalypse is Benjamin West's first version of Death on the Pale Horse. He originally developed the composition as part of a commission from King George III to paint a cycle of religious scenes for a new chapel at Windsor Castle.
 
<b>[1]</b> <i>Horses in a Thunderstorm</i>, oil on canvas, 1798<br>© Royal Academy of Arts, London Artist of the Month - November 2013

Gilpin's dramatic Horses in a Thunderstorm is an ambitious work that endeavours to elevate the status of equestrian art.
 
Paul Sandby RA, <b>[1]</b> <i>View of Windsor Castle from the banks of the River</i>, gouache and watercolour on paper, 1794 <br> © Royal Academy of Arts, London Artist of the Month - December 2013

Paul Sandby was a pivotal water-colourist in the development of British landscape painting and did much to elevate watercolour from its primary association with amateurs and draughtsmen.

 
Robert Anning Bell RA, <i>The Women Going to the Sepulchre</i>, oil on canvas, 1912<br>© Royal Academy of Arts, London Artist of the Month - Janurary 2014

Robert Anning Bell presented The Women Going to the Sepulchre to the Royal Academy as his diploma work on his election as a Royal Academician in 1922. The work depicts the Virgin Mary leading a group of holy women to Christ's tomb, moments before they discover his body has disappeared.
 
David Wilkie Wynfield, <i>Portrait of G.F. Watts RA</i>, albumen print, 1860s<br>© Royal Academy of Arts, London Artist of the Month - February 2014

George Frederic Watts, RA was an influential and pre-eminent painter during his own lifetime. He became known for his portraiture and his Symbolist allegorical paintings, frequently depicting scenes from mythology, history, literature, and the Bible.
 
Norman Stevens ARA, <i>Levens Hall Garden</i>, screenprint, 1985  (Private Collection) <br> © Artist's Estate Artist of the Month - March 2014

Stevens only took up printmaking in the early 1970s, teaching himself the techniques of this medium In doing so, he found an art form that perfectly suited his meticulous approach and enabled him to create images of great subtlety and precision.
 
John Raphael Smith after John Francis Rigaud RA, <i>Agostino Carlini, Francesco Bartolozzi and Giovanni Battista Cipriani</i>, mezzotint published by Boydell on 5th March 1778<br>© Royal Academy of Arts, London Artist of the Month - April 2014

Bartolozzi met King George III's librarian, Richard Dalton, in Italy, who persuaded him to come to London in 1764. Soon afterwards, he was appointed Engraver to the King and subsequently remained in England for nearly 40 years.

 
Angelica Kauffman RA <i>Self-portrait</i> etching, 1770
© Royal Academy of Arts, London Artist of the Month - May 2014

Kauffman painted many self-portraits and often presented herself in various characters and guises. In this small etching she depicts herself leaning on a book, possibly to reflect her learning, and also introduces a column in the background, usually a symbol of fortitude or constancy.
 
image of AST13794 Artist of the Month - June 2014

The drawings made by the renowned British architect Richard Norman Shaw RA are considered among the most brilliant and influential of the late nineteenth century.
 
Ruskin Spear RA, <i>The Old Lyric Theatre, Hammersmith, 1943</i> oil on board, 1979 <br>© Royal Academy of Arts, London Artist of the Month - July 2014

As a flamboyantly self-styled 'working-class cockney', he found subjects for painting in the pubs, snooker halls and streets of Hammersmith, Fulham, Shepherd's Bush and Chiswick.
 
Sir George Clausen RA <i>Interior of an Old Barn</i>, oil on canvas, 1908<br>© Royal Academy of Arts, London Artist of the Month - August 2014

Clausen developed his own form of Impressionism, and through his experimentation with pastel created a luminous palette and fluid approach seen in works from such as Interior of an Old Barn.
 
David Wilkie Wynfield <i>John Phillip RA</i>, albumen print, early 1860s <br>© Royal Academy of Arts, London Artist of the Month - September 2014

Born in Aberdeen, John Phillip RA (1817-1867) spent his youth variously apprenticed to a tinsmith, a glazier and a house painter. He became interested in art at a young age and in 1834 stowed away on the brig 'Manly' to London in order to visit the Royal Academy Exhibition. He entered the Royal Academy Schools in 1837.
 
John Constable RA, <i>Rainstorm over the Sea</i>, oil on paper laid on canvas, c.1824-25 <br>© Royal Academy of Arts, London Artist of the Month - October 2014

Constable's wife Maria contracted tuberculosis in 1819 and from 1824 the couple frequented Brighton hoping that the sea air would improve her health.
 
Ralph Winwood Robinson, Photograph of Sir William Quiller Orchardson RA, platinotype print, c.1889-1891. © Royal Academy of Arts, London. Artist of the Month - November 2014

William Quiller Orchardson RA (1832-1910)
Born in Edinburgh and trained at the Trustees' Academy in the city. From 1845 onwards he joined a circle of young artists - including William McTaggart, John Pettie and Thomas Graham. After moving to London in 1862 he exhibited at the Royal Academy where his portraits and his paintings of historical and literary subjects were well-received.


 
Sandra Blow RA, Green and Red Variations, oil and collage  on canvas, 1978. © Royal Academy of Arts, London. Artist of the Month - December 2014

Sandra Blow RA (1925 - 2006)
I have two equal sources of inspiration. One is art, first the Renaissance art I saw in Italy at the same time I saw the work of Alberto Burri and Nicolas Carone... and later African sculpture and, among other painters, Roger Hilton and Morris Louis. The second influence is nature. I marvel at the beauty and construction of the leaves and flowers outside the studio. I love London skies, because they are framed and one sees them almost like a painting. Sandra Blow
 
Jean Cooke RA, Blast Boadicea, oil on canvas, 1960. © Royal Academy of Arts, London. Artist of the Month - January 2015

Jean Cooke RA (1927-2008)
Jean Cooke studied at Central School of Arts and Crafts and at the Royal College of Art. Her first solo exhibition was held at the Establishment Club in 1963. Jean Cooke has painted many portraits of her family and explored her own image through a series of self-portraits, of which the Royal Academy have three in their collection.
 
image of AST13832 Artist of the Month - February 2015

Charles Stewart's work is imbued with the spirit of the past. As artist, teacher and collector he also embraced the present with energy in response to complex responsibilities and dramas.
 
Stanley Anderson RA (1884-1966) <i>The Wheelwright </i>, line-engraving, 1939<br> © Royal Academy of Arts, London Artist of the Month - March 2015

Stanley Anderson was a painter and printmaker who was one of the first artists to promote the modern revival of line engraving in Britain. Today he is best-known for his prints featuring workers and craftsmen of England's traditional farming and handiwork practices.

 
George Stubbs ARA, <i>A Horse Affrighted at a Lion</i>, etching, 1 May 1788<br> © Royal Academy of Arts, London Artists of the Month - April 2015

From the 1750s onwards, George Stubbs' sole ambition was to create and publish a complete anatomy of the horse. He spent eighteen months at a farmhouse in the village of Horkstow, where he dissected and researched several horses.
 
<i>Study of a Standing Female Nude</i>, Black chalk with white paint highlights on grey wove paper, probably by c. 1856<br> © Royal Academy of Arts, London Artist of the Month - May 2015

Frederic Lord Leighton PRA was one of the leading figures of the Victorian art world. As President of the Royal Academy he promoted artists both within and outside of the Academy.
 
Alfred Elmore RA, <I>Subject from 'Two Gentlemen of Verona</I>', oil on canvas, 1857
© Royal Academy of Arts, London Artist of the Month - June 2015

Alfred Elmore RA (1815-1881)
Elmore was elected a member of the Royal Academy in 1857 and choose to present as his Diploma work a scene from one of Shakespeare's comedies. The mid-19th century saw an increased fascination with Shakespearean subjects.
 
: 'When Summer on the earth was queen…' from Walter Crane, <I>Queen Summer, or the Tourney of the Lily & the Rose,</I> London [&c.]: Cassell & Co., 1891 (p. 2), lithograph,<br> © Royal Academy of Arts, London Artist of the Month - July 2015

Walter Crane (1845-1915)
Walter Crane died 100 years ago this year. He was one of the most important artists in the resurgence of interest in the decorative arts in Britain during the late nineteenth-century.
 
Charles Gere RA, <i>The Blue Lake at Sierre</i>, tempera on silk laid on canvas, 1938<br> © Royal Academy of Arts, London Artist of the Month - August 2015

Gere's work unites the two aesthetic traditions of English landscape painting and the Arts and Crafts movement. He specialised in the use of tempera as a medium, which he studied when spending time in Italy.
 
'Oh, the sight entrancing', steel-engraving by F. P. Becker after Daniel Maclise as published in <I>Moore's Irish Melodies</I>, London, Longman, Brown, Green and Longmans : 1846 © Royal Academy of Arts, London Artist of the Month - September 2015

Daniel Maclise RA was a prodigious draughtsman, and The Royal Academy Illustrated Books Collection houses a wonderful selection of Maclise's printed illustrations made to accompany the poetry of Tennyson, the Irish Melodies of Thomas Moore, Dickens' Christmas Books, Burger's Leonora and The Story of the Norman Conquest.
 
<i> The Battle of Hyderabad, 24th March 1843</i>, oil on canvas, 1854<br> © Royal Academy of Arts, London Artist of the Month - October 2015

Known as 'Captain Jones' by his contemporaries, George Jones RA maintained loyalty throughout his life to his two passions, the Academy and the Army. During his tenure as Keeper, he took his duties very seriously, judging by reports that the Captain patrolled the Schools at night with a drawn sword.
 
Giuseppe Rosaspina after Andrea Appiani, <i>Ingresso dei francesi in Milano, 15 maggio 1796</i>, etching, 1807-16, [central section] <br> © Royal Academy of Arts, London. Artist of the Month - November 2015

Andrea Appiani was appointed Painter to the Emperor in 1808, following nomination by Napoleon himself; his cycle of now-destroyed paintings I Fasti di Napoleone for the Palazzo Reale in Milan demonstrate the admiration and quasi-mythical status of Napoleon in Italy after the 1796 French invasion.
 
<i>George Washington Bridge</i>, lithograph, 1967/68 <br> © Royal Academy of Arts, London Artist of the Month - December 2015

Edwin La Dell was a major figure in post-war British printmaking, notably for the medium of colour lithography. He was Head of the School of Engraving of the Royal College of Art and developed the College's lithography studio, the kind of which had been severely lacking in London during the first half of the century. He was made an Associate of the Royal Academy in 1969 and his lithographic prints specialise in British ceremonies, New York townscapes and of his garden at his home in Kent.
 
Richard Westall RA, <i>Self-Portrait</i>, oil on canvas, by 1793, © Royal Academy of Arts, London. Artist of the Month - January 2016

Richard Westall had his greatest success as a painter of literary and historical subjects including scenes from Shakespeare, Milton, Scott, Byron and Goethe. In late 1827 he became drawing master to the eight year-old Princess Victoria, later Queen Victoria. He taught her twice weekly until his death in 1836. She recalled Westall was 'A very indulgent, patient agreeable master, and a very worthy man.'
 
Thomas Daniell RA, <i>Hindoo Temples at Bindrabund, East Indies</i>, oil on canvas, 1797<br> © Royal Academy of Arts, London Artist of the Month - February 2016

Thomas Daniell RA is best known for his images documenting a geographical and cultural range of sites across the Indian subcontinent. More widely travelled than any of his colonial artist counterparts, Thomas earned the nickname of 'artist-adventurer'.
 
Black and white giclée print of Ann Christopher RA by Anne-Katrin Purkiss
May 2006 Artist of the Month - March 2016

Ann Christopher is an abstract artist best known for her elegant and enigmatic sculpture. She works primarily in metal - cast bronze, stainless steel, silver and fabricated Corten - to create both large and small-scale pieces. In addition to her sculptures, Christopher also produces series of prints and drawings as well as photo assemblages.
 
<i>Uncle Lubin charming the snake</i>, photolithograph after a drawing by W. Heath Robinson for <I>The adventures of Uncle Lubin </I>/ told and illustrated by W. Heath Robinson. - London : Grant Richards, 1902. © Royal Academy of Arts, London Artist of the Month - April 2016

William Heath Robinson (1872-1944) is one of the most celebrated graphic artists of the twentieth century.
 
John Phillip RA, <i>Portrait of Augustus Leopold Egg RA</i>, oil on artist's board, 1859 © Royal Academy of Arts, London Artist of the Month - May 2016

Augustus Leopold Egg was born on the 2nd May 2016 and this year is the 200th anniversary of this birth.
 
Bill Jacklin RA, <i>Coney Island Suite: The Bather</i>, etching, 1992 © Royal Academy of Arts, London Artist of the Month - June 2016

Opening this month, Bill Jacklin RA: The Graphic Work 1961 – 2016 is the first ever retrospective of the artist's graphic work, including his experiments with etchings from the 1960s to monotypes newly created for this exhibition.
 
Dominic Serres RA, Gibraltar relieved by Sir George Rodney, January 1780, oil on canvas, 1780-82. © Royal Academy of Arts, London Artist of the Month - July 2016

Dominic Serres RA (1722-1793)
Serres was the only marine painter to be included among the Founder Members of the Royal Academy. He was born in Gascony, France, and despite his parents' wishes for him to join the church, he ran away on to a ship bound for South America. He ended up in Havana, Cuba, where he was taken prisoner by a British frigate and was brought to England in the 1750s.


 
John Bellany RA, <i>Self-portrait of John Bellany RA</i>, oil on board, 1966 © Royal Academy of Arts, London Artist of the Month - August 2016

John Bellany grew up in the East Lothian fishing community of Port Seton, and both the sea and his strict Calvinist upbringing were to be the greatest influences on his life and work. He once said that "I love to paint. At heart, however, I am a mariner".
 
Carel Weight RA, The Departing Angel, oil on canvas, 1961 <br>
© Royal Academy of Arts, London Artist of the Month - September 2016

Like many of Carel Weight's paintings The Departing Angel is set in his Wandsworth garden. It presents the religious story of the Annunciation in a contemporary context.
 
<i>Divided # 84</i>, oil on cottonduck, 1999 <br>© Royal Academy of Arts, London Artist of the Month - October 2016

Painter, draughtsman and printmaker, Cockrill's career was marked by dramatic changes in style. Elected to the Royal Academy in 1999, he was Keeper of the Royal Academy Schools from 2005 to 2011.
 
image of AST3865 Artist of the Month - November 2016

During his lifetime, John Gibson was Britain's most famous sculptor. His particular style of neoclassicism held great appeal for a large international clientele that included aristocrats and royalty as well as wealthy industrialists and connoisseurs.
 
image of AST13892 Artist of the Month - December 2016

Charles Robinson's distinctive illustrations accompanied many children's stories in the late nineteenth century and early twentieth century, when developments in printing techniques offered illustrators more creativity.
 
image of AST14012 Artist of the Month - January 2017

Elizabeth Blackadder RA (b.1931)

During the 1970s Blackadder's subject matter shifted from bleak landscapes in earthy tones to flowers grown in her own garden. This may stem from her growing confidence in painting, which she believed more challenging to capture beautiful subject matter. "As a student, one wants to paint distressing things. It's quite easy to tackle grim things - it's difficult to paint beauty."
 
image of AST221 Artist of the Month - February 2017

John Singer Sargent RA (1856 - 1925)

John Singer Sargent was born in Florence in 1856, the son of an American doctor. Although he didn't come from an artistic background, his mother was encouraging when he decided to become an artist at the early age of 12. As a child, he travelled widely in Europe and America before studying in Rome, Florence and Paris.
 
image of AST14030 Artist of the Month - March 2017

Dame Laura Knight RA (1877-1970)

The painter Laura Knight (née Johnson) was born on 4 August 1877 at Long Eaton, Derbyshire. She was a voracious artist from a very young age, writing in her autobiography, The Magic of a Line (1965), that 'I had loved pencil and paper to be thrust through the bars of my cradle'. After her father left, Laura's mother provided for the family through teaching art in Nottingham, and early on spotted her daughter's talent. Laura trained at the Nottingham School of Art from 1890 to 1895 where she met her future husband, the painter Harold Knight RA (1874-1961). The couple married in 1903.
 
image of AST13799 Artist of the Month - April 2017

Ruskin Spear RA (1911-1990)
As a flamboyantly self-styled 'working class cockney', Ruskin Spear RA found subjects for painting in the pubs, snooker halls and streets of Hammersmith, Fulham, Shepherd's Bush and Chiswick in London.
 
image of AST13723 Artist of the Month - May 2017

Sir Hugh Casson PRA (1910-1999)

Sir Hugh Casson PRA was probably the most popular British architect of his time. In such high-profile roles as Director of Architecture for the 1951 Festival of Britain and President of the Royal Academy of Arts, he successfully bridged the gap which divided traditional and modern artists and architects during the mid-twentieth century.
 
image of AST14049 Artist of the Month - June 2017

Leonard Rosoman RA (1913-2012)

Leonard Rosoman RA led a successful career as an illustrator, painter, muralist and an Official War Artist in the Second World War. In 1969 Rosoman was elected a member of the Royal Academy giving The Promotion No. 1 as his Diploma Work.
 
image of AST13835 Artist of the Month - July 2017

Sir Lawrence Alma-Tadema RA (1836-1912)

A Dutch painter inspired by the luxury and decadence of the Roman Empire, Sir Lawrence Alma-Tadema RA strived for authenticity in his portraiture, design and depictions of domestic life in Classical Antiquity.
 
image of AST14066 Artist of the Month - August 2017

Charles Tunnicliffe RA (1901-1979)

Charles Tunnicliffe's upbringing on a farm outside Macclesfield in Cheshire had a huge impact on his future career as one of the 20th century's most celebrated wildlife artists.
 
image of AST14075 Artist of the Month - September 2017

Maurice Lambert RA (1901 - 1964)

Maurice Lambert was born in Paris in 1901. At the age of seventeen he was apprenticed to the artist Francis Derwent Wood for five years. His works are largely figurative, often with rounded forms reminiscent of classicism, in a style that was popular with British sculptors in the 1920s and '30s.
 
image of AST14082 Artist of the Month - October 2017

John Flaxman RA (1755-1826)

John Flaxman was born in York and grew up in London where he studied sculpture at the newly-founded Royal Academy Schools from 1769. Fascinated by ancient myth and literature from an early age, some of his first sculptures depicted subjects from Homer and Ovid.